Kids these days

From all of my recent onstage rants in support of youth (thanks to the blindly trusting adults who allowed me to do so). Join the revolution.

Youth have somehow always ended up on the right side of history – if only in retrospect. Time and time again, fresh eyes and fearless minds discredit the cynical institution’s blind antagonism of change. Idealistic? Of course. Impractical? Perhaps. But never impracticable. The expansion of that Judy Blume young adult chapter between childhood and adulthood prompted the emergence of a distinctive youth culture via radical student movements of the 50s and 60s – too opinionated to succumb to authority, yet footloose to adult responsibility and certainly defiant to the mandates of parents, universities, governments, The System. Paradigm shift after shift, youth at their best have continued to perceive and drive conversation around fundamental injustices to visible minority groups. At the very least, they have defined monumental leaps in style, art, film and music. No mean feat. Yet, each generation eventually grows into a prescribed mentality of what capitalism calls “success” an...

Sofia

Sofia Richie is one of those cool girls of legendary lineage and mysterious influence – of whom you hear around town as being “super chill” and “down to earth” and “not about all that stuff” (cue universally understood eye-roll at Tinseltown in general). And indeed, she’s all of those things.

Professional, curious, calm and considered. She wanted to know about the designers I was styling her in – particularly new graduate, Panayota Theodore. She understood lighting. She was composed beyond her 18 years, and went against everything the adult world says she and her generation ought to be. We pumped out this editorial story for Vogue China’s VogueMe in a few hours one sunny afternoon, and conducted the below phone call from our cars on opposite sides of the planet between meetings. A pleasure, SR. Much respect. SR: Hey girl. How are you? MZ: Hey how’s everything going – are you back in LA? SR: I’m back in LA – just went and viewed a house with a friend, so if I sound crackly let me know because I’m basically on a mountain. I just got back from New York for the Met Ball. MZ: You looked awesome – did you have a rad time? SR: Such a great time. I was there with Topshop. It was so much fun. Such a cool group of people. MZ: And now back in town for work? S...

Milan

On set of a shoot at the end of last week, the journalist dispatched to question me about my style, my style, my style and my style, asked after each look: “So where would you wear this outfit?”.

“To buy groceries.”

L’Officiel: Art + Tech

We gravitate towards things that we don’t quite understand and call it genius.

Women in Motion

Get in, get sweaty, get out, go to work.

Giddy Up

Like most nine-year-olds, I had a solid two or three months of extreme equestrian obsession, though probably confined to The Saddle Club (Hello World) and National Velvet.

About

Margaret Zhang 章凝 is an Australian-born-Chinese director, photographer, stylist and writer based between New York and Shanghai. Since establishing her website in 2009, Margaret has gone on to work with global brands including CHANEL, UNIQLO, Swarovski, YEEZY, Bulgari, Gucci, MATCHES, Under Armour, and Louis Vuitton in a wide range of capacities both in front of and behind the camera, while completing her Bachelor of Commerce/Bachelor of Laws at The University of Sydney. Margaret’s directing, photography, and styling has been employed by the likes of VOGUE, L’Officiel, Harper’s BAZAAR, NYLON, Marie Claire, GRAZIA and ELLE internationally. She has been listed in Forbes Asia’s 30Under30 and TimeOut’s 40Under40, and her work has been recognized as shaping the international fashion industry by the Business of Fashion BoF500 Index for the past four consecutive years. She went on to be the first Asian face to cover ELLE Australia. In 2016, she co-founded BACKGROUND, a global consultancy for which she specialises in Western-to-Chinese and Chinese-to-Western cultural bridging for a range of luxury, lifestyle, and brand initiatives. In 2017, she exhibited a series of 39 unseen photographic works as a solo show in Sydney, and premiered her first short film – a 15-minute exploration of her visceral relationship with classical music on both performance and abstract planes – to critical acclaim.

For project enquiries Tess.Stillwell@img.com
General enquiries bookings@margaretzhang.com.au